For those who travel to eat

France’s most acclaimed chef and owner of three-star restaurant Arpege, Alain Passard, declared that as a nation, Singaporeans live to eat. We travel in search of food too, and apparently, the world knows it. Earlier this month (Aug 15), Taipei rolled out an offer exclusive to Singaporeans, where we'll get discounts, offers and more. Simply get a hold of the Star Feasts Fun Taipei 2018 booklet, given to China Airlines flyers to Taiwan. With the recent launch of Taiwan’s own Michelin Guide earlier this year, here’s our pick of the best Michelin-starred restaurants to check out while you're there, including Andre Chiang’s RAW.

Le Palais 

 



Taiwan’s first and only three Michelin-starred restaurant is helmed by Chef Chen, whose relentless pursuit for perfection has taken him across Asia. Housed at the ritzy Palais de Chine Hotel, Le Palais is luxuriously romantic with a dreamy backdrop of silk trees; and chairs, upholstered in rich teal velvet that broker a beautiful union of French and Oriental aesthetics. Equal care is paid to the menu with classic hearty Cantonese staples such as Le Palais' famed duck, braised goose foot, and roast suckling pig, all executed to perfection and deftly plated in gourmet fashion. It's undoubtedly the locale for lavish dinners, high-powered meetings and family reunions. Datong District, Section 1, Chengde Road

 

Raw

 


Chef Andre, one of the pioneers of Singapore’s fine-dining scene left a trail of broken hearts and empty stomachs when he packed up, shuttered and left Singapore. Diners had forked up to $800 for a final gastronomic experience at the chef’s eponymous two Michelin-starred restaurant then. The same fans can now relive elements of his cooking at his Taipei establishment, RAW. Operating within a space that boasts a tailored modernism with Scandinavian touches, RAW places extreme emphasis on provenance and quality. The menu changes every fortnight according to microseasons and flirts with the deconstruction of local favorites, like the Taiwanese fried chicken. Be floored by experimental tastes and textures. But be warned—reservations are notoriously difficult to score. Lequn 3rd Road, Zhongshan District
 

Taïrroir 

 



Fusion cuisine underdog Tairroir is positively indulgent. It serves up a cohesive blend of locally-sourced ingredients with French execution and poetic Mandarin names to boot. Think bouillabaisse (Provençal seafood stew) with Chinese Yam, and pigeon from the Pingtung province served with a drizzling of seaweed coulis. An intrepid risk-taker, Chef Kai-Ho artfully melds innovation and tradition. Zhongshan District, Lequn 3rd Road

 

RyuGin 

 



From the famed Araki in London to Aoki in Singapore, Japanese chefs consistently deliver honest-to-goodness fare that is impeccably accentuated by mere freshness. Taiwanese ingredients are front and centre here; but RyuGin also maintains its strong heritage and seasonal ingredients are flown in daily from Japan. For their omakase offerings, trust is imperative but also easy. The current menu includes luscious sashimi, grilled fish and meat of the day, cooked over binchotan. Before moving to the sweets, they also serve Koshihikari rice sweetened by seafood broth and paired with pickles. The set menu also includes two desserts. Wine pairing is recommended. Zhongshan District, Lequn 3rd Road
 

L'Atelier de Joel Robuchon 




The world’s most decorated chef is arguably Joel Robuchon, who enjoys a total of 32 Michelin stars spread among his various restaurants. While being able to patronize L’Atelier just a skip away from us seems like a bittersweet victory after his Singapore exit, it's probably still worth indulging in. L'Atelier's haute-cuisine is decadent—entrees of caviar with cauliflower cream; langoustine ravioli with foie gras sauce; and lobster with corail butter topped with a spicy bisque. For mains, try the quail stuffed with foie gras. Xinyi District, Songren Road